Difference between revisions of "Axion Minicluster and NS"

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(Observational Constraints)
 
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|NeutrinoCounterpart    = --
 
|NeutrinoCounterpart    = --
 
|References            = http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JETPL.101....1T
 
|References            = http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JETPL.101....1T
|Comments              = The predicted emission timescale, the energetics, luminosities, and event rate are in-keeping with FRB observations.
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|Comments              = None
 
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== Model Description ==
 
== Model Description ==
  
Axion clumps with masses below the stellar range, known as Axion Bose Clusters or “miniclusters”, have been considered as FRB progenitors. In the strong magnetic field of a compact object, an instability may arise in a minicluster, causing it to explosively decay into photons via a synchrotron maser mechanism.
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Axion clumps with masses below the stellar range, known as Axion Bose Clusters or “miniclusters”, have been considered as FRB progenitors. In the strong magnetic field of a compact object, an instability may arise in a minicluster, causing it to explosively decay into photons via a synchrotron maser mechanism. The predicted emission timescale, the energetics, luminosities, and event rate are in-keeping with FRB observations.
  
 
== Observational Constraints ==
 
== Observational Constraints ==
  
 
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Latest revision as of 04:58, 12 October 2018





Summary Table
Category Progenitor Type Energy Mechanism Emission Mechanism Counterparts References Brief Comments
LF Radio HF Radio Microwave Terahertz Optical/IR X-rays Gamma-rays Gravitational Waves Neutrinos
Collision / Interaction Axion Minicluster and NS Single Maser Synch. Yes -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JETPL.101....1T None

Definitions: LF Radio (3 MHz to 3 GHz); HF Radio (3 GHz to 30 GHz); Microwave (30 to 300 GHz)


Model Description

Axion clumps with masses below the stellar range, known as Axion Bose Clusters or “miniclusters”, have been considered as FRB progenitors. In the strong magnetic field of a compact object, an instability may arise in a minicluster, causing it to explosively decay into photons via a synchrotron maser mechanism. The predicted emission timescale, the energetics, luminosities, and event rate are in-keeping with FRB observations.

Observational Constraints

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